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The site may not look like it yet but it really is the website of Chris Dadds and his Slot Car Track building expertise. If you really have a burning desire to know about his tracks and services before he figures out how to build his own website with WordPress, e-mail him at kineticarts@comcast.net or call him at 812-219-6771

calendar February 12, 2013 category Blog


6 Responses

  1. interetsed in a 4 lane on 6 lane boards home track of at least 150 feet, any used tracks? if not can you build

    • Hi Harvey,
      I don’t have any used tracks but I can build one for you. How about telling me how much space you have available and what part of the country you live in. I price tracks based on how much time it’s going to take to build it and with the many ways people want them built these days I can only quote once I know what I’m being asked to build. If you have links to some pictures of tracks detailed to the level you want I can ballpark pretty quick and then we can tighten up the project from there.

      So tell me about the space, where I’d be delivering to, what scale you want to race and what appearance you like.

      Enjoy!
      Chris

  2. I’m open to suggestions. Im thinking a 6 lane home use track built solid enough to move on the racecar trailer once a year or to be raised and lowered from the ceiling of the shop. I’m thinking a simple slight banked oval that has a dirt bull ring vibe. The footprint can’t be longer than 18 feet and can’t be wider than 8 feet. I’m thinking 1/32 scale commercial kit cars, not piano wire plastic wings of hyper-speed.. The sprint kits look like a good fit to my imagination. Progressive banking with more room between lanes in the turns and snug spacing between lanes at mid straight. Long sweeping turns and narrow straights that resemble Tulare Thunderbowl or Ocean Speedway when viewed from Google Earth. The track will be intentionally slick, not grip. If cross-over lane changing is functionally an option I would have inside 3 lanes swap with outside 3 lanes at each corner entry. Not as over-passes, but as flat intersections. That would add a realism that would be pretty cool. But lane swapping is not a must, especially if it messes up the functionality of the track. I’m not an electronics or electrician guy. I’m a decent carpenter. I can paint. I’m an excellent fabricator. I’m a real racer, 20 years of dirt modified on the west coast. My son is 9 and has the racer bug bad. My neighborhood has 5 other racers and at least 20 of my son’s buddies within walking distance so the track will be used. On you tube I’ve seen several dirt oval themed tracks that look perfect but I do not have the skill to build one. I would need everything but cars, and either very easy instructions for set up or handed over as ready to run. I’m in the central valley in Atwater, a small town between Fresno and Modesto on 99. What kind of budget makes this happen? Do you have better suggestions? Thank you.

    • Hi Johnny,
      Thanks for asking about tracks. My first thought is to fix you up with a six lane, evenly spaced all around at 3 1/2″ because that’s the easiest to build. The lanes would dive into the corners in a Real Racing Line pattern, insetting about an inch in the turns. The track would be built with two strait sections and two turn sections that would need the legs screwed on and the sections bolted together once it got to you. All painting braiding and wiring would already be done so it’s simple to set up. Because I live and build in Southern Indiana it would be cheapest to ship it to you and I’d guess off the top of my head that would cost 1500 in addition to the 3000 price of the track.

      Now if you want the really cool racing we could do it as a Digital Track. That would let you run up to 20 cars on a four lane track at the same time. Each car would be able to change which lane they were running on at a couple of places on the track. It wouldn’t be a quick jerk between lanes like on a plastic track but would happen smoothly at the exit of the turn so the tires are in full contact with the surface all through the drift in the turns. That option would add another 3500 or so in electronics to the package but it includes a few controls and cars. Look up Scorpius Wireless on the web.

      Those are all some really broad numbers off the top of my head but it can give you an idea. Out your end of the country is a fellow named Bob Scott who builds a lot of 1/32 tracks. He may be able to help you get what you want without the shipping costs. I only know he’s out there. My schedule would let me start your project in July I think and we’ll have to talk some more before I could guess what the production time would be. Interested in tightening these numbers up? Let me know what you find out. Enjoy!

  3. Just want to know if you are still in business in 2021. Always wanted a home built track & your reputation is the best !
    Hope to Hear From You !

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